iNPLACENEWS Blog Has MOVED

September 14, 2008

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John McCain Is Not Internet Savvy Compared to 106 Year Old

July 21, 2008

If Sen. John McCain is really serious about becoming a Web-savvy citizen, perhaps Kathryn Robinson can help.

Robinson is now 106 – that’s 35 years older than McCain – and she began using the Internet at 98, at the Barclay Friends home in West Chester, Pa., where she lives. “I started to learn because I wanted to e-mail my family,” she says – in an e-mail message, naturally.

Blogs have been buzzing recently over McCain’s admission that when it comes to the Internet, “I’m an illiterate who has to rely on his wife for any assistance he can get.” And the 71-year-old presumptive Republican nominee, asked about his Web use last week by the New York Times, said that aides “go on for me. I will have that down fairly soon, getting on myself.”

How unusual is it for a 71-year-old American to be unplugged?

That depends how you look at the statistics. Only 35 percent of Americans over age 65 are online, according to data from April and May compiled by the Pew Internet Project at the Pew Research Center.

But when you account for factors like race, wealth and education, the picture changes dramatically. “About three-quarters of white, college-educated men age over 65 use the Internet,” says Susannah Fox, director of the project.

“John McCain is an outlier when you compare him to his peers,” Fox says. “On one hand, a U.S. senator has access to information sources and staff assistance that most people do not. On the other, the Internet has become such a go-to resource that it’s a curiosity to hear that someone doesn’t rely on it the way most Americans do.”

McCain spokeswoman Brooke Buchanan presented a somewhat updated picture when contacted by The Associated Press on Friday: “He’s fully capable of browsing the Internet and checking Web sites,” Buchanan said. “He has a Mac and uses it several times a week. He’s working on becoming more familiar with the Internet.”

That’s a good thing, says Tobey Dichter, CEO of Generations on Line, a group that helps bring seniors – including the 106-year-old Robinson – into the digital age.

“He needs the self-empowerment” of going online himself, says Dichter. “There are too many people surrounding John McCain who are willing to print an e-mail for him” -or do a search on his behalf, like the aides who, he says, show him the Drudge Report.

“But that cheats him of an opportunity to let his own mind take him to the next link,” says Dichter. “If he doesn’t know what links are available, he will only get exactly what he’s asking for, and nothing more.”

Why do most of us – 73 percent of Americans – use the Internet? The top three reasons are, in order, e-mail, informational searches, and finding a map or driving directions.

But there are dozens of other conveniences: Online banking, shopping, travel or restaurant reservations, job searches, real estate listings, and of course, the news (McCain, like many people over 30 or so, prefers his newspapers the old-fashioned way.) “The Internet is the ultimate convenience appliance,” says Fox.

McCain may be in “digital denial,” as Dichter calls it, but his family sure isn’t: His wife, Cindy, has been seen scrolling away on her Blackberry, and daughter Meghan, one of his seven children, blogs from the campaign trail on McCain Blogette.

As for McCain’s Democratic rival, Barack Obama is 46, and thus in an age group where fully 85 percent of Americans are plugged in. A CNN clip available on YouTube shows him so engrossed with his Blackberry while crossing a street that he bumps into the curb.

McCain’s frank admissions of his offline state have led to discussion of whether being wired is a qualification for leading the free world. One aide, Mark Soohoo, defended the senator’s lack of wiredness at the Personal Democracy Forum in New York in June by assuring the panel: “John McCain is aware of the Internet.”

One blogger opined last week that all the fuss is silly. McCain, wrote Newsweek’s Andrew Romano, hasn’t become computer literate because he hasn’t needed to. “When aides are responding to your messages and briefing you on every imaginable subject, the incentive to get online sort of disappears,” he wrote.

McCain is hardly the only prominent, wealthy, powerful man in the country to lack an affinity with computers. To take one, Sumner Redstone, the 85-year-old chairman of Viacom, “is not an avid user,” says a spokesman, Carl Falto. “He’s capable of going on but doesn’t do it frequently.”

On the other hand, famed Broadway director Arthur Laurents, 91, whose “Gypsy” is now a hit on Broadway, is known to respond faster to e-mails than to phone calls.

Among fellow senators, aides to Sen. Robert Byrd, 90, say he has a computer but prefers to speak directly to his staff and doesn’t carry a Blackberry.

What keeps some American seniors unwired? Some lack immediate access to a computer, Dichter says. But intimidation, she says, is the greatest problem.

“One has to be compassionate with a person who hasn’t gotten onto the information highway early, because the cumulative vocabulary is so intimidating,” she says. Also, many older people “feel they have a perfectly happy life without it. They feel that the world is overrun with electronic devices already.”

But, Dichter says, such people often change their minds when they realize they can get family pictures via e-mail – not to mention health information, support groups, and local community news. And Fox, of Pew, notes that seniors outpace other age groups in tracing their family’s genealogy online (a third of them say they do so, compared to a quarter of all Internet users.)

Robinson credits her computer with helping her withstand the effects of a stroke she suffered in 2003. “In my case I had a stroke and as a result could not talk,” she says in her e-mail. “The computer has been a lifesaver for me.”

Article by Jocelyn Novec

Andre Jetmir iNPLACENEWS

Copyright 2008 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.


Bush Encourages World Toward Sanctions in Zimbabwe

July 7, 2008

President George W. Bush has urged the international community to punish the Zimbabwe government for suppressing its political opponents and using violence at the ballot box

“I care deeply about the people of Zimbabwe,” Bush told the G-8 annual summit in Hokkaido Toyako, Japan. “I am extremely disappointed in the elections, which I labeled a sham election.”

Incumbent Zimbabwe President Robert Mugabe maintained power as the only candidate in last month’s election. His only challenger, opposition leader Morgan Tsvangirai, withdrew from the race.

Tsvangirai said his Movement For Democratic Change party decided not to participate because of an ongoing campaign of political intimidation and violence at the hands of Mugabe supporters.

Tsvangirai won the most votes in the March 29 election, but not enough — according to official figures — to avoid a runoff.

UK Prime Minister Gordon Brown, also at the G-8 summit, said Monday that he believes “there is growing support for sanctions against the Mugabe regime” because very few countries recognize his government.

The British prime minister added that there is growing support for a U.N. envoy to be dispatched to “to make sure that the parties in Zimbabwe know that we’ve got to work for a transition so that there is a legitimate government, one that we can support, and one, when it does exist, we will want to help with the reconstruction (of Zimbabwe).”

Jakaya Kikwete, president of Tanzania and current head of the African Union, is one of seven African leaders at the summit. AP reported him as saying on the issue of Zimbabwe “that the only area that we may differ is on the way forward.

“We are saying no party can govern alone in Zimbabwe, and therefore the parties have to work together in a government and look at the future of their country together.”

Meanwhile UK Foreign Secretary David Miliband Monday called on South Africa to support a “way out” for neighboring Zimbabwe that includes a transitional, opposition-led government.

“I believe this is an agenda that is not a British agenda or a Western agenda but a humanitarian agenda around which the world can unite,” said Miliband in a speech at the University of South Africa in Pretoria.

The UK has been a harsh critic of Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe who Miliband blamed for turning “the weapons of the state against his own people” in order to retain his grip on power.

Mugabe has been Zimbabwe’s only leader since independence in 1980, before which it was called Rhodesia and ruled by the UK. Britain is one of many countries that do not recognize Mugabe’s reelection.

Miliband has called for the current Mugabe government to be replaced by a transitional government to be led by Tsvangirai. He is visiting South Africa, a member of the U.N. Security Council which is expected to consider a sanctions resolution against Zimbabwe.

“The world community needs to unite at the U.N. this week not just to condemn violence but to initiate sanctions on the regime and send a human rights envoy to Zimbabwe,” Miliband said.

Story originally found @ CNN.com

iNPLACENEWS


Neo-Con Limbaugh Hates McCain

June 9, 2008

One of the best indicators of John McCain’s weakness in the general election is the questioning of his manhood by right-wing pundits.

Rush Limbaugh — who likes to dress up as a general and command his listener’s to foment political violence — took time out this week to besmirch McCain’s maleness, wondering on air if the Republican candidate could really count as “a man” in the wake of his speech in New Orleans (link).

What prompted Limbaugh to make a negative ruling on McCain’s manhood was not that McCain bashed Bush, but that McCain dared to criticize ‘government’ in his New Orleans speech earlier this week. What did McCain actually say in New Orleans that made Limbaugh slap down his dress-up-general riding crop beyond his normal paroxysms? This paragraph gives the main thrust of the McCain speech (emphasis mine):

“The right change recognizes that many of the policies and institutions of our government have failed. They have failed to keep up with the challenges of our time because many of these policies were designed for the problems and opportunities of the mid to late 20th Century, before the end of the Cold War; before the revolution in information technology and rise of the global economy. The right kind of change will initiate widespread and innovative reforms in almost every area of government policy — health care, energy, the environment, the tax code, our public schools, our transportation system, disaster relief, government spending and regulation, diplomacy, the military and intelligence services. Serious and far-reaching reforms are needed in so many areas of government to meet our own challenges in our own time.”

For playground-soldier Rush Limbaugh, when a Republican gives a speech that questions the effectiveness of government, that forfeits said Republican’s status as “a man.” What would have earned McCain his “I’m a man” badge? Blaming the destruction of New Orleans on liberals, of course (as if you had to ask).

But after reading that New Orleans speech by McCain — the one that has been widely ridiculed in the media since he delivered it on Tuesday — I noticed that McCain was actually trying to do something astounding. He was trying to use that speech (1) to bring Reagan-esque themes into the election and (2) to reframe this election as a referendum on “government,” not a referendum on “Bush” (e.g., to undercut the Obama campaign’s framing strategy).

11 times in his New Orleans speech John McCain used the word “government.” 11 times! It was a sure-fire sign that he was trying to set a frame — and that nobody in the media actually noticed he was doing it, nor did they bother to ask why he was doing it.

The reason is simple: McCain is afraid to bash Bush; so he is trying to make this election a referendum on “government.”

If, for example, I swap the words”‘George W. Bush” for the phrase “of our government” in the above paragraph from McCain’s speech, this is what we get:

“The right change recognizes that many of the policies and institutions of George W. Bush have failed. They have failed to keep up with the challenges of our time because many of these policies were designed for the problems and opportunities of the mid to late 20th Century, before the end of the Cold War; before the revolution in information technology and rise of the global economy. The right kind of change will initiate widespread and innovative reforms in almost every area of government policy — health care, energy, the environment, the tax code, our public schools, our transportation system, disaster relief, government spending and regulation, diplomacy, the military and intelligence services. Serious and far-reaching reforms are needed in so many areas of government to meet our own challenges in our own time.”

Yep. That is really what this election is about, but McCain is just too scared to say it. Instead, he will try to reframe debate in terms of “government.”

More importantly, perhaps, by critiquing “government” instead of ‘George W. Bush,’ McCain is going back to the old hobby horse of Ronald Reagan — patron saint of conservative framing and archetypal Republican manly man’s man.

The model for McCain’s speech must have been Reagan’s oft-cited “Time for Choosing” speech (1964) in which Reagan railed against government, against the liberal “elite” who supposedly ran government, and in so doing set a conservative framing strategy that held the debate up to this very year.

In that 1964 election between Barry Goldwater and the incumbent Lyndon Johnson, Reagan set the frame with phrases like this one:

“This is the issue of this election: whether we believe in our capacity for self-government or whether we abandon the American revolution and confess that a little intellectual elite in a far-distant capitol can plan our lives for us better than we can plan them ourselves.”

Yep — that is the idea that McCain is trying to dig up and toss into this election almost 45 years later. Interestingly, it is the idea that gets his manhood castigated by the likes of Limbaugh, who no doubt thinks he embodies the true manliness of Reagan.

In reality, the Reaganism that McCain is trying to reclaim is no longer the core idea the guides the voice of American conservatism. Steered by right-wing pundits and fueled by hateful, violent rhetoric, contemporary conservatives no longer say that government is wasteful and inefficient. Instead, they say that liberalism kills, liberalism supports terrorism, liberalism will lead to the destruction of America.

No wonder McCain gets called a sissy by Limbaugh when he tries to channel Reagan rather than bash Bush — because Limbaugh has long since left the Reagan legacy behind in favor of the new violent rhetoric of the right.

And the irony does not stop there, because in all likelihood, Limbaugh’s bashing of McCain will bully him into conformity — will goad him into retooling his campaign into some kind of “liberals will kill you” message. The paradox, of course, is that this will mean that an actual war veteran – -who survived torture and still bears the scars of that experience on his body — will likely allow his manhood to be questioned by a drug addict who cross-dresses as a general and equates salivating on cigars with public service.

Rush Limbaugh, the quintessential military-dodging conservative coward, in other words, will humiliate the war veteran in this election.

This was originally blogged @ The Huffington Post

iNPLACENEWS


Hillary Clinton’s Right Hand Is Even For Obama

May 20, 2008

A top strategist for Barack Obama has reached out to Hillary Rodham Clinton’s former campaign manager about joining forces for the general election, the latest sign of political reconciliation between the two rivals as Obama begins consolidating his position as the likely Democratic nominee.

Obama strategist David Axelrod and former Clinton aide Patti Solis Doyle confirmed they had had informal conversations about how she might help the Illinois senator if he secures the presidential nomination as expected. The conversations were first reported on the Politico Web site.

“When the time comes, if we’re the nominee, we’re going to want to work with talented people across the party including those who worked for Senator Clinton,” Axelrod said. “Patti’s a good and talented person, and we all have a high regard for her.”

He added, “No specific offers have been proffered, and none has been accepted. This is not an official entreaty from one campaign to another.”

Solis Doyle hails from Chicago, Obama’s home turf, and met Axelrod 20 years ago while working in city government there. Her brother, Danny Solis, is a Chicago alderman.

A longtime Clinton loyalist, Solis Doyle began working as Hillary Clinton’s scheduler during her husband’s 1992 presidential bid and stayed with her through two terms in the White House. She helped manage the former first lady’s first New York Senate bid in 2000, and began laying the groundwork for her presidential bid shortly thereafter.

In February, Solis Doyle stepped down as campaign manager after Clinton’s third-place showing in Iowa and disappointing performance in the 22-state “Super Tuesday” contests Feb. 5. Maggie Williams, Clinton’s former White House chief of staff, replaced Solis Doyle.

Clinton has vowed to stay in the race through the final primaries June 3 even as she trails Obama in the popular vote and among pledged and superdelegates. She has also pushed for a resolution of disputed primaries in Michigan and Florida, whose results were voided after the states violated party rules by moving their contests to January.

Obama is expected to secure the majority of pledged delegates Tuesday after primaries in Kentucky and
For her part, Solis Doyle said in an interview that her status has not changed.

“I’m for Hillary, I have been for 17 years. This thing isn’t over,” Solis Doyle said. “But I’m a Democrat and if Obama’s the nominee, I will do whatever I can to get him elected and make sure the party is unified.”

The orignal article was found @ Yahoo News

iNPLACENEWS


The Polls Going Into Tuesday’s Primaries in OR and KY

May 19, 2008

New polls show Sen. Hillary Clinton with a commanding lead going into the Kentucky primary, while Sen. Barack Obama holds a comfortable one in Oregon.

Those two states, which hold contests Tuesday, are expected to do little more than illustrate the divide between Democratic voters in selecting a presidential candidate.

Clinton leads the latest CNN “poll of polls” — an average of multiple polls — in Kentucky, 58 percent to 28 percent. Kentucky is dominated by working-class voters, which has been a source of support for Clinton throughout the prolonged primary season.

Obama’s base of support — young and higher-educated voters — are better represented in Oregon, and a poll of polls there reflects that demographic: The senator from Illinois holds a 50 percent to 40 percent advantage over Clinton.

The former first lady is campaigning Monday in Kentucky, while former President Clinton and daughter Chelsea are on the trail in Oregon.

Obama spoke Sunday in front of what his campaign called his biggest audience to date — 75,000 people on the banks of the Willamette River in Portland, Oregon.

Obama will campaign Monday in Montana, which, along with South Dakota, will hold the last contests of the primary season on June 3. Democratic voters in Puerto Rico will cast their ballots June 1.
Clinton on Sunday told voters in Kentucky that she’s “running for the toughest job in the world.”

Speaking in Bowling Green, the senator from New York said it was a “treat” to have the whole state to herself since Obama would not be returning there.

Clinton has faced calls to drop out of the race since she trails Obama across all fronts — in pledged delegates, superdelegates and the popular vote.

Clinton recently has argued she has a lead over Obama in the popular vote, counting the Florida and Michigan primaries. Video Watch why Clinton says she’s ahead »

But the Democratic National Committee stripped Florida and Michigan of their delegates for scheduling their primaries too early, and Clinton was the only top-tier candidate whose name was on the ballot in Michigan.

Clinton’s campaign also excludes caucus states in its popular vote count.

Obama leads Clinton in total delegates, 1,904 to 1,717, according to a CNN survey. A candidate needs 2,026 to clinch the Democratic nomination.

Clinton on Sunday encouraged her Kentucky supporters to vote, saying, “If we get everybody turned out, it’s going to send a great message to our country that you don’t stop democracy in its tracks.”

She said, “You don’t tell some states that they can’t vote and other states that have already had the opportunity that they’re somehow more important.”

In considering which candidate to vote for, she told the crowd to “think about this as a hiring decision.”

“Come out and vote for me on Tuesday. I’ll work my heart out for you,” she said.

Meanwhile Obama, who’s been campaigning in Oregon, focused his attacks on Sen. John McCain, the presumptive Republican nominee.

Obama on Sunday suggested that McCain hasn’t received the kind of scrutiny that he’s received throughout the campaign.

“It is very understandable that the press focus has been on myself and Sen. Clinton because this has been a pretty exciting race on the Democratic side. I would expect that the press will submit him to the same scrutiny that they are submitting me,” he said at a senior center in Gresham. 

Obama also detailed his plans to strengthen Social Security. Part of his proposal includes eliminating income taxes for seniors making less than $50,000 a year.

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Obama made low-key campaign stops this weekend, hitting a street festival in Keizer and stopping for ice cream in Eugene.The last time Oregon carried much weight in the primary season was in 1968, when Sen. Robert Kennedy campaigned for the Democratic nomination.

This story found @ CNN.com

iNPLACENEWS


Sometimes a picture speaks a THOUSAND words

April 11, 2008

Just when you think Bill Clinton learned from his mistakes, he did just what the above gentleman did: put his foot in his mouth.

He put his foot in his mouth such to the point that even his own wife’s campaign had to publically play his words off and discount them. Why bring Bosnia up? Sniper fire? I think many Americans had moved on. let it be. Bill obviously thinks so highly of himself that he rather listen to himself put his foot in his mouth than quiety let hs wife do what she does best. Wait, what is that exactly?

Hmmm.