iNPLACENEWS Blog Has MOVED

September 14, 2008

Hey everyone!  From all the staff to all the readers of our blog and the watchers of our live news programming broadcasted live over the internet directly to your desktop, we want to thank you for all your support and participatiion.  We have relocated our blog to iNPLACENEWS.COM.  There you will find all our blogs, including the old posts, your comments you made, the place to download our free desktop player and all of the current news from around the world.  Stay up-to-date on all the current events by watching our broadcasts, reading our blogs, and watching videos-on-demand.  Again, go to iNPLACENEWS.COM for all the newest blogs and the older posts you love to go back to read.  Thank you again for your time, support, and participation.

-iNPLACENEWS


Study Shows No Decrease In Illicit Drug Use in US Adults

September 4, 2008

Cocaine and methamphetamine use among young adults declined significantly last year as supplies dried up, leading to higher prices and reduced purity, the government reports. Overall use of illicit drugs showed little change.

About one in five young adults last year acknowledged illicit drug use within the previous month, a rate similar to previous years. But cocaine use declined by one-quarter and methamphetamine use by one-third.

Drug use increased among the 50-59 age group as more baby boomers joined that category. Their past month drug use rose from 4.3 percent in 2006 to 5 percent in 2007.

“The baby boomers have much higher rates of self-destructive behavior than any parallel age group we have data from,” said John Walters, director of the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy. Walters, 55, is a boomer himself.

The National Survey on Drug Use and Health, being released Thursday by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, is based on interviews with about 67,500 people.

Overall, about 20 million people 12 or older reported using illicit drugs within the past month. Marijuana was the most popular by far, with 14.4 million acknowledging use of marijuana in the past month.

Among adolescents, age 12 to 17, drug use dipped from 9.8 percent in 2006 to 9.5 percent last year, continuing a five-year trend. Their use of alcohol and cigarettes also fell during the same period.

“The earlier you use drugs, alcohol and cigarettes, the more likely you are to have a lifelong problem,” Walters said.

Much of the progress in curbing drug use occurred between 2002 and 2005. Critics of the nation’s drug policies warned not to read too much into the latest numbers.

“Use of marijuana and other drugs naturally fluctuates and if you look at long-term trends, current rates are smack in the middle of the range they’ve been in for decades,” said Bruce Mirken of the Marijuana Policy Project, which advocates the decriminalization of marijuana. “There is simply no evidence that current policies … have made any difference.”

A World Health Organization survey of 17 countries this year showed that people in the U.S. were more likely than people elsewhere to have tried illicit drugs. The U.S. tied New Zealand for the highest rate of marijuana use and far outpaced other countries on cocaine use, the survey found.

The U.S. report measured drug use over the past month, while the WHO’s looked at drug use over a lifetime.

The WHO survey concluded: “The use of drugs seems to be a feature of more affluent countries. The U.S., which has been driving much of the world’s drug research and drug policy agenda, stands out with higher levels of alcohol, cocaine, and cannabis, despite punitive illegal drug policies as well as a higher minimum legal alcohol drinking age than many comparable developed countries.”

More than half the people who tried drugs for the first time in 2007 used marijuana, according to the U.S. survey. The rate of new marijuana users came to about 6,000 people a day.

The overall rate of illicit drug use dropped from 8.3 percent of those 12 and older to 8.0 percent in 2007.

Walters also acknowledged concern about nonmedical use of prescription pain relievers among young adults. He urged parents to have more awareness of where they keep their prescriptions and to throw them away when the drugs are no longer needed.

The survey, which also examined mental health, indicated that 24.3 million people 18 or older experienced “serious psychological distress over the past year.” It stressed the link between mental health and substance abuse, noting that adults experiencing depression within the past year were more than twice as like to have tried illicit drugs during that time than other adults.

Article by Kevin Freking

iNPLACENEWS

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No Jail For Amy This Time

May 14, 2008

Amy Winehouse is free without worry of being prosecuted for the video tape handed to the police sometime in January. A spokeswhore for Wino released the following statement Wednesday morning:
“Police have confirmed that no action will be taken against Amy Winehouse in relation to an investigation into a video handed to them in January. She was questioned by policelast week and released on unconditional bail. They have now concluded their enquiries and no charges will be brought. Amy’s bail date to return to Limehouse police station has been cancelled, bringing this matter to an end.
Amy is pleased to be able to move on and concentrate on music and particularly looks forward to seeing herfans again at eagerly awaited festival performances this summer.”

iNPLACENEWS


Amy Winehouse Arrested For Drugs Again

May 7, 2008

Before and After CRACK and COKE

Amy Winehouse went to the local police station to answer some questions. At that time, she was shown a video tape of her smoking crack and snorting cocaine. After that, she was arrested. More like Amy Winewreck…..

iNPLACENEWS


Israel tests Ecstasy on war trauma victims

April 26, 2008

An Israeli medical team has started tests using the drug Ecstasy as a treatment for conflict-linked post-traumatic disorders, the Maariv daily reported on Friday.

Doctors at the Beer-Yakov psychiatric hospital south of Tel Aviv are testing the response of Israeli post-traumatic disorder patients to MDMA, the active ingredient in the drug.

Rakefet Rodriguez, Sergio Marchiveski and Marina Kaufchicz, who are leading the experimental programme, are convinced that psychotheraphy is crucial in curing patients and that Ecstasy can help them to recover.

The doctors believe the drug has both calming and stimulating effects that can help patients not only overcome trauma but also dominate it, Maariv said.

Almost 500 reserve troops suffered from post-traumatic stress disorder following the 34-day war that pitted Israeli troops against Lebanon’s Hezbollah Shiite militia in July and August 2006, the paper said.

Ecstasy, which is illegal in most countries, is one of the world’s most commonly used narcotics.

iNPLACENEWS


We Don’t Need No Stinkin’ Warrants

April 23, 2008

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The Supreme Court offered unanimous support for police Wednesday by allowing drug evidence gathered after an arrest that violated state law to be used at trial, an important search-and-seizure case turning on the constitutional limits of “probable cause.”

The Supreme Court unanimously gave police broader powers to search for and seize evidence.

“When officers have probable cause to believe that a person has committed a crime in their presence, the Fourth Amendment permits them to make an arrest, and to search the suspect in order to safeguard evidence and ensure their own safety,” Justice Antonin Scalia wrote.

David Lee Moore was stopped by Portsmouth, Virginia, officers five years ago for driving his vehicle on a suspended license. Under state law in such incidents, only a summons is to be issued and the motorist is to be allowed to go. Instead, detectives detained Moore for almost an hour, arrested him, then searched him and found cocaine.

At trial, Moore’s lawyers tried to suppress the evidence, but the state judge allowed it, even though the court noted the arrest violated state law. A police detective, asked why the man was arrested, replied, “Just our prerogative.”

While some of the justices expressed concern about that level of discretion at oral arguments in January, their 9-0 ruling raised few such doubts.

“The arrest rules that the officers violated were those of state law alone,” Scalia said. “It is not the province of the Fourth Amendment to enforce state law.”

The state had argued an arrest is constitutionally reasonable if officers have probable cause to believe a suspect has committed a crime. “This standard represents the best compromise between the needs of the citizens and the duty of the government to combat crime,” Stephen McCullough, Virginia’s deputy solicitor general, had told the high court.

But Moore’s attorney, Thomas Goldstein, called an “extreme proposition” the idea that it would be reasonable “to go out and arrest someone for a non-arrestable offense and not only do that, but having committed that trespass at common law, to further search them.”

There has been widespread judicial confusion over how such police searches should be handled. Some lower courts had ruled that when state arrest law is violated, the Constitution provides a remedy in the suppression of any evidence resulting from the arrest and a related search.

But the justices agreed with the majority of courts that said constitutional requirements are satisfied when an officer has probable cause to make an arrest, even if some provision of state law was violated in the process.

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg wrote a concurring opinion suggesting Virginia change its law to make driving on a suspended license an arrestable offense.

During arguments, Ginsburg spoke for several colleagues when she pointed out that if a summons had been issued in Moore’s case, any incriminating evidence would have been excluded. “Would you explain the logic to saying that when the police violate state law, then the evidence can come in, but when they comply with state law, it can’t,” she asked.

The ruling means Moore’s original jury conviction and 3-½ year prison term will stand.

This story was found @ CNN.com

iNPLACENEWS


CNN Reporter Richard Quest Found With Rope Around His Balls

April 19, 2008

The blog story of the week so far, and it’s only Monday, CNN anchor Richard Quest was arrested Friday after being stopped in Central Park after curfew. The 46 year-old Quest was apprehended 3:40 on Friday morning for possession of methamphetamine. It’s also been reported that at the time of his arrest Quest had a sex toy in his boot and… a rope tied around his neck with the other end of the rope secured around his genitals. How those facts came to light we don’t know. Quest has been ordered to drug counseling. The misdemeanor charges will be dropped upon completion of the drug treatment. We wish you all the best Richard.

He wasn’t joking around!

If you’re gonna get arrested, that sure is a memorable way to do it!

This story is found at iNPLACENEWS

*** From what I can tell, this gives a whole new meaning to choking the chicken. Ouch!