iNPLACENEWS Blog Has MOVED

September 14, 2008

Hey everyone!  From all the staff to all the readers of our blog and the watchers of our live news programming broadcasted live over the internet directly to your desktop, we want to thank you for all your support and participatiion.  We have relocated our blog to iNPLACENEWS.COM.  There you will find all our blogs, including the old posts, your comments you made, the place to download our free desktop player and all of the current news from around the world.  Stay up-to-date on all the current events by watching our broadcasts, reading our blogs, and watching videos-on-demand.  Again, go to iNPLACENEWS.COM for all the newest blogs and the older posts you love to go back to read.  Thank you again for your time, support, and participation.

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Russia and China Veto UN Sanctions of Darfur

July 12, 2008

Russia and China vetoed proposed sanctions on Zimbabwe’s leaders Friday, rejecting U.S. efforts to step up punitive measures against the authoritarian regime after a widely discredited presidential election.

Western powers mustered nine votes, the minimum needed to gain approval in the 15-nation council. But the resolution pushed by the Bush administration failed because of the action by two of the five veto-wielding permanent members.

The other three states with veto power – the U.S., Britain and France – argued that sanctions were needed to respond to the state-sanctioned violence and intimidation against opponents of President Robert Mugabe before and after Zimbabwe’s recent presidential election.

The proposal would have imposed an international travel ban and freeze on personal assets of Mugabe and 13 key officials.

Russian U.N. Ambassador Vitaly Churkin said sanctions would have taken the U.N. beyond its mandate in trying to punish political disputes by “artificially elevating them to the level of a threat” to international peace and security.

Chinese Ambassador Wang Guangya, whose nation is one of Zimbabwe’s major trading partners, also expressed fears of nation-tinkering and said Zimbabwe was should be left to conduct its own talks on how to resolve its political crisis.

“The development of the situation in Zimbabwe until now has not exceeded the context of domestic affairs,” Wang said. “It will unavoidably interfere with the negotiation process.”

South Africa, a Zimbabwe neighbor that holds one of the council’s non-permanent seats, led the opposition to the sanctions, arguing that Zimbabwe is not a threat to international peace.

Supporters of the resolution had counted Burkina Faso’s Ambassador Michel Kafando as the crucial swing vote. “As a means of exerting pressure, it could help,” he said of the sanctions resolution before the vote.

U.S. Ambassador Zalmay Khalilzad expressed disappointment and said he found it “disturbing” that China joined with Russia.

In London, British Foreign Secretary David Miliband criticized the veto, saying that “it will appear incomprehensible to the people of Zimbabwe.”

The action put an end for now to efforts to apply more international pressure on Mugabe’s regime and force it to share power with the opposition leader, Morgan Tsvangirai.

Both sides say they are willing to share power, if only during a transition to new elections, but differ on who should lead it. The long-ruling ZANU-PF party wants Mugabe at the head, something the opposition and Mugabe’s critics in the West have rejected.

Article by John Heilprin

iNPLACENEWS

Copyright 2008 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.


Bush’s Real Agenda For America

May 20, 2008

Barbara Harvey climbs into the back of her small Honda sport utility vehicle and snuggles with her two golden retrievers, her head nestled on a pillow propped against the driver’s seat.

Californian Barbara Harvey says she is forced to sleep in her car with her dogs after losing her job earlier this year.
A former loan processor, the 67-year-old mother of three grown children said she never thought she’d spend her golden years sleeping in her car in a parking lot.

“This is my bed, my dogs,” she said. “This is my life in this car right now.”

Harvey was forced into homelessness earlier this year after being laid off. She said that three-quarters of her income went to paying rent in Santa Barbara, where the median house in the scenic, oceanfront city costs more than $1 million. She lost her condo two months ago and had little savings as backup.

“It went to hell in a handbasket,” she said. “I didn’t think this would happen to me. It’s just something that I don’t think that people think is going to happen to them is what it amounts to. It happens very quickly, too.”

Harvey now works part time for $8 an hour, and she draws Social Security to help make ends meet. But she still cannot afford an apartment, and so every night she pulls into a gated parking lot to sleep in her car, along with other women who find themselves in a similar predicament.

There are 12 parking lots across Santa Barbara that have been set up to accommodate the growing middle-class homelessness. These lots are believed to be part of the first program of its kind in the United States, according to organizers.

The lots open at 7 p.m. and close at 7 a.m. and are run by New Beginnings Counseling Center, a homeless outreach organization.

It is illegal for people in California to sleep in their cars on streets. New Beginnings worked with the city to allow the parking lots as a safe place for the homeless to sleep in their vehicles without being harassed by people on the streets or ticketed by police.

Harvey stays at the city’s only parking lot for women. “This is very safe, and that’s why I feel very comfortable,” she said.

Nancy Kapp, the New Beginnings parking lot coordinator, said the group began seeing a need for the lots in recent months as California’s foreclosure crisis hit the city hard. She said a growing number of senior citizens, women and lower- and middle-class families live on the streets.

“You look around today and there are so many,” said Kapp, who was homeless with her young daughter two decades ago. “I see women sleeping on benches. It’s heartbreaking.”

She added, “The way the economy is going, it’s just amazing the people that are becoming homeless. It’s hit the middle class.”

She and others with New Beginnings walk the streets looking for people and families sleeping in their cars. The workers inform them about the parking lot program.

New Beginnings screens people to make sure they won’t cause trouble. No alcohol or drugs are allowed in the parking lots.

“What we are trying to do is we pull bad apples out, and we put good apples in the parking lots and really help people out,” said Shaw Tolley, another coordinator with New Beginnings.

Most of the time, the lots are transition points. New Beginnings works with each person to try to find a more permanent housing solution.

“It saddens me when they live in their vehicles,” Tolley said. “It is not the most ideal situation for senior citizens and families, but it is reality.”

He added, “We need to engage this problem. This is reality.”

John Quigley, an economics professor at the University of California-Berkeley, said the California housing crisis has left many middle-class families temporarily homeless or forced them to go to food banks to feed their families.

“Part of the reason why it’s so painful in Santa Barbara is there’s so little in the way of alternative housing,” Quigley said. “If there were alternative low and moderate housing and rental accommodations that were reasonably close by, you can imagine it wouldn’t have this desperate look to it as people living in their cars.”

At the only lot for women in Santa Barbara, it’s a tough existence. There are no showers or running water. On the night CNN visited, a half-dozen women already were in the parking lot before nightfall.

Linn Labou, 54, lives in her car with four cats. She used to be in the National Guard and is on a waiting list for government housing, but the wait is a year long.

“I went looking for family, but I couldn’t get them to help me,” she said.

As for Harvey, she begins each day by walking her two dogs before going to her part-time job. She leaves the dogs in her car with its windows cracked while she works.

It’s another chapter in her life that she’s certain she’ll get through, even though she said she knows it pains her children. Her 19-year-old daughter moved in with friends to avoid being homeless.

“My daughter especially is very unhappy. Sometimes she’ll cry and she’ll call and say, ‘Mom, I just can’t stand it that you are living in a car,’ ” Harvey said. “I’ll say, ‘You know what? This is OK for right now because I’m safe, I’m healthy, the dogs are doing OK and I have a job and things will get better.'”

This was originally posted @ CNN.com

iNPLACENEWS


Man Arrested For making 12 year old a Dominatrix

May 14, 2008

Federal prosecutors have unsealed an indictment accusing Todd B. Barkau, 35, of New York state, and a 44-year-old woman of training the woman’s child to be a dominatrix, selling her sexual services and photographing some of the acts. U.S. Attorney John Wood said the case is unusual in that a parent has been charged with the commercial sex trafficking of his or her own young child. Having once lived together in Blue Springs, Missouri, the sex business was supposedly run.

“Barkau obtained control of a 12-year-old girl and he groomed, trained and forced her to become a sexual dominatrix,” the U.S. attorney said in Kansas City on Monday. The mother’s name is not being published to protect the identity of the daughter, now 20. Both suspects will likely be held in federal custody without bail, according to a motion filed by federal prosecutors.

The indictment says the training began in 2000, when the girl was only 12. It also says she was forced to engage in sex acts with him and with other men. According to the indictment, he also had the girl watch pornography on the Internet as a teaching tool. Further, Barkau used the internet to market the girl and her services for about two years. The mother is charged with encouraging and participating in the venture, the indictment says.

Prosecutors will reportedly seek $80,000 the couple is accused of having made through sex trafficking.

iNPLACENEWS


San Diego State Drug Bust Tied To Fraternities

May 7, 2008

After what authorities are calling a major drug bust at San Diego State Univeristy, it has become clear that there were members of certain fraternities involved in supposedly openly dealing drugs on campus. The investigation was started last year with the cocaine overdose death of a sorority member ultimately lead to the arrest of 96 people of which 75 were San Diego State University students. Another drug-related death happened during the course of the investigation. Of the people arrested, 29 people were arrested during the early-morning Tuesday raids on nine locations including a fraternity, Theta Chi. Agents of the DEA found cocaine, ecstacy, and three guns. Of those arrested, 18 were wanted on warrants for selling to undercover agents. Theta Chi and five other fraternities have been suspended pending a hearing. This law enforcement investigation was dubbed, Operation Sudden Fall, as if the Drug War waas taking a page out of the book of Afghanistan.

There is speculation that profits may have been used in the financing of the fraternity.

More on this story as it unfolds.

iNPLACENEWS


Bush Seizes Assests Of Companies in Myanmar

May 2, 2008

On Thursday, President Bush froze the assets of state-owned companies in Myanmar. These companies all allegedly were aiding the nation’s military junta, which has been condemned by the international community for suppressing pro-democracy activists and their cause.

“These companies, in industries such as gems and timber, exploit the labor of the downtrodden Burmese people, but enrich only the generals,” Bush said of Myanmar, also known as Burma.

The new order allows the Bush administration to go after state-owned enterprises, something it didn’t have the authority to do. The U.S. government has the power to go after individuals and companies.

At the White House, during remarks Bush made marking the beginning of Asian Pacific American Heritage Month, Bush said the military regime in Myanmar continues to reject the will of its people to live under leaders of their own choosing.

Seems to have come in time when our government needs more money. Good going, Bush!?!

iNPLACENEWS