Andy Dick Arrested Again For Drug Charges and Sexual Battery

July 16, 2008


According to the Sheriff’s Department, 42-year old comedian Andy Dick was arrested shortly before 2 a.m. Wednesday in the parking lot near the Buffalo Wild Wings Grill & Bar in Murrieta. Details were not released other than that it was for investigation of drug use and sexual battery and is being held on $5,000 bail.

Mr. Dick has a history with law enforcement. In 1999, Dick was arrested for possession of cocaine and marijuana after driving his car into a telephone pole in Hollywood, but he went into a diversion program in lieu of jail time. Last year, he was cited in Columbus, Ohio, for urinating in public.

Andre Jetmir iNPLACENEWS


Bush and Cheney Claim Executive Privilege when Subpoened

July 16, 2008

President Bush has asserted executive privilege to prevent Attorney General Michael Mukasey from having to comply with a House panel subpoena for material on the leak of CIA operative Valerie Plame’s identity.

A House committee chairman, meanwhile, held off on a contempt citation of Mukasey – who had requested the privilege claim – but only as a courtesy to lawmakers not present.

Rep. Henry Waxman, chairman of the House Oversight Committee, rejected Mukasey’s suggestion that Vice President Dick Cheney’s FBI interview on the CIA leak should be protected by the privilege claim – and therefore not turned over to the panel.

“We’ll act in the reasonable and appropriate period of time,” Waxman, D-Calif., said. But he made clear that he thinks Mukasey has earned a contempt citation and that he’d schedule a vote on the matter soon.

“This unfounded assertion of executive privilege does not protect a principle; it protects a person,” Waxman said. “If the vice president did nothing wrong, what is there to hide?”

The assertion of the privilege is not about hiding anything but rather protecting the separation of powers as well as the integrity of future Justice Department investigations of the White House, Mukasey wrote to Bush in a letter dated Tuesday. Several of the subpoenaed reports, he wrote, summarize conversations between Bush and advisers – are direct presidential communications protected by the privilege.

“I am greatly concerned about the chilling effect that compliance with the committee’s subpoena would have on future White House deliberations and White House cooperation with future Justice Department investigations,” Mukasey wrote to Bush. “I believe it is legally permissible for you to assert executive privilege with respect to the subpoenaed documents, and I respectfully request that you do so.”

White House spokesman Tony Fratto said Bush invoked the privilege on Tuesday.

Waxman said he would wait to hold a vote on Mukasey’s contempt citation until all members of the panel had a chance to read up on the matter.

The Bush administration had plenty of warning. Waxman warned last week that he would cite Mukasey with contempt unless the attorney general complied with the subpoena. The House Judiciary Committee also has subpoenaed some of the same documents from Mukasey, as well as information on the leak from other current and former administration officials.

Congressional Democrats want to shed light on the precise roles, if any, that Bush, Cheney and their aides may have played in the leak.

State Department official Richard Armitage first revealed Plame’s identity as a CIA operative to columnist Robert Novak, who used former presidential counselor Karl Rove as a confirming source for a 2003 article. Around that time Plame’s husband, former Ambassador Joseph Wilson, was criticizing Bush’s march to war in Iraq.

Cheney’s then-chief of staff, I. Lewis “Scooter” Libby, also was involved in the leak and was convicted of perjury, obstruction and lying to the FBI. Last July, Bush commuted Libby’s 2 1/2-year sentence, sparing him from serving any prison time.

Libby told the FBI in 2003 that it was possible that Cheney ordered him to reveal Plame’s identity to reporters.

Article by Laurie Kellman
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Copyright 2008 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.


McCain Supports School Vouchers at NAACP Convention

July 16, 2008

On Wednesday, John McCain told the annual convention of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, he will expand education opportunities for children in failing schools, including vouchers for children to attend private school. The NAACP is the nation’s oldest civil rights organization

In his speech, McCain praised Democrat Barack Obama’s historic campaign. McCain added that Obama is wrong to oppose school vouchers for students in failing public schools. Tools like vouchers and other merit pay for teachers to break from conventional thinking on educational policy. The question remains though, how does McCain to help raise money for such programs without raising taxes or greatly scaling back or cutting expenses like the war he supports.

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