Mistaken Fedex Delivery Leads to 400 Pounds of Marijuana

July 5, 2008

A mistaken delivery of a Fedex package tipped off police to a 200-pound shipment of marijuana that someone tried to send from Pembroke Pines, Florida to Baltimore. According to police, they learned about the shipment when it was delivered Tuesday to the wrong resident.

Authorities posing as FedEx employees arrested the shipment’s intended recipient, 30-year-old Richard Gwatidzo. He was charged Thursday with possession of a large quantity of a controlled dangerous substance with intent to distribute along with other drug related charges.

Also seized were eight other FedEx boxes with nearly 400 pounds of the drug.

In the end of this anti-drug operation, the authorities are trying to determine the sender’s identity.

With all the states passing laws allowing medical marijuana, it leaves us to wonder if authorities will burn it, smoke it, or let sick people have it.

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Bush McCain need 100 years to improve the economy and to bring troops home.

July 5, 2008

Bush in his speech to the G8 stated that “There is no quick fix for the economy”. Some how, I feel he was inferring, if he had more time, he could fix it. It would take Bush & McBush at least a 100 years to begin to understand it and another 100 to improve it. By then we would, no doubt, be known as the New China… a name change after defaulting on our gazillion dollar loan payments to Old China.

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Secretly Recorded Video Shows Vote Rigging in Zimbabwe

July 5, 2008


Video secretly recorded by a Zimbabwean prison guard appears to show evidence of vote-rigging in the country’s recent presidential runoff election.

The footage, shot with a secret camera provided by the British newspaper The Guardian, was posted on the paper’s Web site Saturday. The paper said the guard had since fled the country with his family.

The video shows the guard being summoned along with other prison guards to an office at Harare’s central jail days before the June 27 runoff between President Robert Mugabe and opposition leader Morgan Tsvangirai.

Once there, a supporter of Mugabe’s ZANU-PF party instructs the guards to vote by postal ballot while he watches. The ZANU-PF supporter takes careful note of the guards’ ballot numbers and which candidate they vote for, and even helps a guard properly fold his ballot and put it inside the envelope.

“The atmosphere in the room seems benign, but it’s deceptive,” the voiceover says, adding that the ZANU-PF supporter “has the power to condemn them as MDC supporters.”

MDC is the Movement for Democratic Change, the opposition party headed by Tsvangirai.

Allegations of vote-rigging in the election are not new, but evidence of it has been rare. The Guardian said the video is believed to be the first footage of vote-rigging from the Zimbabwean election.

According to the paper, the guard made the film to draw further attention to violence and corruption in Zimbabwe. He initially wanted to chronicle secretly life inside Zimbabwe’s jails but kept filming when he found himself present for the postal voting, the paper said.

He also filmed a compulsory meeting at the jail at which top prison officers instructed the guards whom to vote for, the paper said.

As the guards sit in rows of chairs, a man at the front of the room says, “Forward with ZANU-PF! Down with MDC!” Later on, the man says, “Tsvangirai, even if you vote for him, even if he wins, he will never rule this country.”

The paper says the guard worked for the prison service for 13 years but fled the country this week with his wife and children.

“I’ve decided to leave Zimbabwe,” he tells the camera. “It is a painful decision that I should leave.”

Asked about the Zimbabwe video, White House spokesman Tony Fratto said that “there should be no question in anyone’s mind that Mugabe was not elected by the people.

“He used corruption, intimidation, and violence to keep this election from being free and fair, as the evidence seems to show every day. The international community should stand together in recognizing that the election was a sham, and Mugabe is not the legitimate leader of Zimbabwe.”

Tsvangirai dropped out of the runoff amid complaints of violence and intimidation, but his name and image remained on the ballot in what became a widely discredited one-man election. Mugabe claimed victory and was sworn in for a sixth consecutive term this week.

Mugabe has come under harsh international criticism for the election-related violence. The African Union this week stopped short of condemning him but urged dialogue between Mugabe and Tsvangirai.

The opposition leader has rejected that call, saying conditions are not conducive to talks.

A draft resolution before the U.N. Security Council would impose U.N. sanctions on Mugabe and 11 senior members of his government.

The sanctions would impose a travel ban on Mugabe and the others, would freeze many of their assets, and would impose an international arms embargo on the regime.

The draft, circulated by the United States this week, expresses deep concern at voting irregularities, violence, and intimidation ahead of the runoff vote that it said made free and fair elections impossible.

Story courtesy of CNN.COM

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Man Flies Lawnchair Lifted By Balloons From Oregan to Idaho

July 5, 2008


Riding a green lawn chair supported by more than 150 helium-filled party balloons, Kent Couch took off Saturday in his third bid to fly from central Oregon all the way to Idaho. In 2006, he had to parachute out after popping too many balloons. And last year he flew 193 miles to the sagebrush of northeastern Oregon, short of his goal. Couch was inspired by a TV show about the 1982 lawn chair flight over Los Angeles by truck driver Larry Walters, who gained folk hero fame but was fined $1,500 for violating air traffic rules.

This time, cheered by a crowd of spectators, Couch rose out of the parking lot of his gas station into the sky. Couch hoped to ride the prevailing wind to the area of McCall, Idaho, about 230 miles east. He travels at about 20 mph. Each balloon gives four pounds of lift. The chair was about 400 pounds, and Couch and his parachute 200 more.

“If I had the time and money and people, I’d do this every weekend,” Couch said before getting into the chair. “Things just look different from up there. You’ve moving so slowly. The best thing is the peace, the serenity.

“I’d go to 30,000 feet if I didn’t shoot a balloon down periodically,” Couch said. For that job he carried a Red Ryder BB gun and a blow gun equipped with steel darts. He also had a pole with a hook for pulling in balloons, Global Positioning System tracking devices, an altimeter and a satellite phone.

“He’s crazy,” said his wife, Susan. “It’s never been a dull moment since I married him.”

Couch had to dump some of the 45 gallons of cherry Kool-Aid he carried as ballast before he was able to disappear into the distance. “We wanted some color, and it kind of reminded me of kid days,” he said of the ballast.

Couch, a veteran of hang gliding and sky diving, estimated the rig cost about $6,000, mostly for helium. Costs were defrayed by corporate sponsors.

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