RIP – Bo Diddley

June 3, 2008

Lendary musician Bo Diddley passed away Monday due to heart failure. He was 79 years old.

Diddley had suffered a heart attack in August 2007, three months after suffering a stroke while on tour in Iowa.

Diddley is often credited as a key figure in the transition from blues to rock’n’roll.

iNPLACENEWS


Hulk Hogan’s Son Wants Out of Solitary Confinement

June 3, 2008


Hulk Hogan’s son, Nick Bollea, is serving eight months in jail after pleading no contest to causing a crash that seriously injured his friend. Because he’s too young to join the jail’s general population, he is being held in solitary confinement at the Pinellas County Jail’s medical ward.

His lawyers said in a motion filed Friday that the situation is giving him “unbearable anxiety”, which he says results from spending up to 17 hours a day alone in his cell without access to amenities like educational programs.

They asked a judge to consider alternatives like releasing him with ankle monitoring until his 18th birthday or moving him to the jail’s minimum-security section. For once, it sounds like a celebrity advantage is not being used. This is a reasonable claim and should be addressed fairly by the courts. It is about his age.

iNPLACENEWS


Slovakia Attempting to Get the Euro As Currency

June 3, 2008


European Union finance ministers have began the process to incude EU newcomer Slovakia in the euro currency zone next year by approving its membership.

Slovakia cleared major hurdles when it won backing from the European Commission and European Central Bank that it had met a set of strict economic standards to allow it swap its currency, the koruna, for the euro on January 1, 2009.

A final decision from finance ministers in July will be the last hurdle the country hasd to clear to become the 16th euro nation, making it only the second of 10 new EU members to adopt the currency. The currency exchange rate will also be fixed then.

iNPLACENEWS


Zimbabwe’s Mugabe May Be Stripped of Knighthood

June 3, 2008

British officials are seriously considering revoking the knighthood of Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe. British TV news also reported Monday that the Foreign Office is taking steps to remove Mugabe’s honorary knighthood, awarded in 1994 by the government of Prime Minister John Major.

Revoking the title is a detailed, lengthy process that starts with the Foreign Office recommending the forfeit of the award, the spokeswoman said. That recommendation is made to the queen via the prime minister’s office. If the queen approves the recommendation, the Central Chancery of the Orders of the Knighthood is informed, according to officials (the chancery is part of the palace and organizes the knighthoods and honors). Finally, the Foreign Office notifies the recipient of the honor that it is being revoked.

Meanwhile, Mugabe used a U.N. food summit to launch an attack on his country’s old colonial master, accusing Britain of persuading other Western powers to impose policies against Zimbabwe that “cripple” his country’s economy and “thereby effect illegal regime change.” Mugabe’s presence at the Summit is causing outrage among some leaders, as he claims Britain and her allies is mounting polices and efforts to impose “illegal economic sanctions” against Zimbabwe while also cutting off “all developmental assistance”.

On the other hand, critics blame Mugabe’s policies for a dramatic drop in food production and agricultural exports in Africa’s “breadbasket”, Zimbabwe.

The African leader has frequently attacked Britain in the past. Ironically, knighthood is normally given to those trying to assist relations and situations with Britain, not merely act the country or its policies.

iNPLACENEWS


FLDS Sect in British Columbia May Be Busted

June 3, 2008

Since the raid on the El Dorado, Texas compound of a polygamist sect of FLDS followers, the Canadian government has been rying to fgure out if they can also pursue legal and criminal actions against another branch of the same Mormon-splinter.

Attorney General Wally Opal called for a special prosecutor to look into allegations of sexual abuse and sexual exploitation of girls in the community in Bountiful, British Columbia. He said the issue is whether the criminal code on polygamy is constitutional, which has been a point of contention in British Columbia’s judiciary for 20 years. At the Attorney General’s request, two lawyers recently issued opinions on the matter, both concluding it would be difficult to pursue criminal charges. One said it would be unfair to do so.

Opal picked Vancouver lawyer Terrence Robertson to determine whether the sect can be prosecuted successfully.

More on this story to come.

iNPLACENEWS